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Thursday, June 25, 2015

Frauberger edging

I decided to try my hand at converting a Tina Frauberger edging into a bookmark. This is Figure 28 from the 1919 publication of Schiffchenspitze, which can be accessed for free on Georgia Seitz's website for the Archive of Tatting Books in the Public Domain.

Here is my progress so far:


I'm tatting this in Lizbeth size 80 Scottish Thistle. It's coming out to be about the same size as the Priscilla bookmark in size 80. Size 40 would work too, but size 20 is a little too big for a bookmark.

I had the same experience as Frivole when tatting a Frauberger pattern. This one had to be significantly reduced in size from the original (I reworked the numbers from the ground up to make it easier to tat). The only counts that remain true to the original are the trefoils along the periphery of the bookmark. I will share my version of the pattern in a week or two (still thinking about making a minor edit to what I'm using above).

21 comments:

  1. Looks wonderful! It sounds as though there's a lot of work involved, but it certainly looks worth the effort.

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  2. I love Tina's works. She was very creative.
    Your rendition looks great.

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  3. Oh, that is pretty!

    For me the Frauberger patterns are murder to tat!
    Fox : )

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    1. Yes, the order of operations to get the thread on the correct side was tricky. No help from the original instructions. Also, I found that to get the trefoil centered I have to make two Catherine wheel joins (one before the trefoil and one after the trefoil), which can be rather tedious!

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    2. I couldn't figure out how you got it to look so amazing! I looked up the C Wheel join and it's kind of like a single false chain stitch made to cover the joining picot. I think I can do that now. I'm going to be cutting off a row of your doily but that's ok. thank you so much for the patterns and the tips.

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    3. Ah yes, the Catherine Wheel Join. It slows the tatting down a lot, but has a nice effect by maintaining the curvature of the chain. At first it is fiddly to make, but after you get the hang of it, it's not too bad.

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  4. Tina's crowns were my first attempt at a TR and with the advice and encouragement from others I was able to complete them. Such pretty tatting. As I don't read books much, big long bookmarks make great headbands.

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  5. Oh, that looks so fabulous!!! :)

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  6. That's lovely, pretty rendition of that pattern. I tried something when they first put the book online, love it.

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  7. I love all those patterns and downloaded them all they are beautiful and make up very well the design and look of most of them appeal to me and I too redo the numbers. I often wonder how the did such beautiful patterns with no computer!

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  8. That is gorgeous and looks so delicate :).

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  9. Beautiful!! I love this pattern and have had it in my "to do" file for a long time!!

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  10. Very pretty! I look forward to seeing your stitch count so that I can try this out as well.

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  11. Very pretty, will look lovely as a bookmark, will you be writing it out as a pattern for us.
    Margaret

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    1. Due to the amount of interest in this pattern, I'll try to post my hand written diagram and notes over the weekend for those that want to tat along with me. I just need to use a piece of scrap tatting to test a minor stitch count alteration, which shouldn't take too long.

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  12. Such a Very beautiful piece of tatting & lace ! Glad you could overcome the 'difficulties' in the original ... worth it :-)
    I am testing out some of Endruck's patterns, trying to adapt them to modern times & it does get a bit difficult to orientate ... And her patterns, though cleverly engineered, are not as beautiful/elegant as Frauberger's. Will definitely give this a try in future ...

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    1. I had never heard of Endruck and had to look her up. Her patterns look complicated and surprisingly modern for the time period. Lots of block tatting though, which I have yet to learn.

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    2. Ditto ! Heard of her only a couple of weeks back when Georgia asked if I'd be interested in trying out one particular pattern from her book. It was pretty complicated, so I decided to do a couple of the initial patterns to get a feel for her designing.

      However, that is not block tatting as we do it now. It is simply 'normal' chains that are lock joined to previous chains, and which serve to traverse between points/elements, while creating a block-tatting effect with their to and fro movement ! Like I said, clever engineering ;-)

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  13. I just discovered your blog thru Pinterest. I am new to tatting and you inspire me big time. Thank you for sharing your designs and patterns.

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    1. Thanks tekamuna. It was only a few years ago that I stumbled onto tatting myself, and questioned whether I would be "smart" enough to learn it. I have been inspired by many people along the way :)

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  14. What a nice design! Your bookmark adaptation looks fabulous. Well done!

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