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Friday, September 30, 2016

Magic Square, with triangles?

I stumbled upon this idea quite accidentally, as I was making some adjustments to one of my triangle bookmarks. I wondered, "What would happen if I combined some of the elements of the bookmark with one of my repeatable squares?" After sketching it on my iPad, I realized that I had created a variation of the magic square. Here it is, tatted in Lizbeth size 20, Country Grape Medium:


It is all tatted in one pass, but I had to add new thread as my shuttles weren't large enough to hold what was needed.

For those who are unfamiliar with the magic square, it is a tatting pattern made up of simple rings and chains. What makes it "magic" is the fact that it is cleverly designed so that one could, in theory, make a square of any size, all in one pass. I've never tatted the original, but I have seen a number of photos (Google "tatting magic square") and there have been some forum and blog discussions about the pattern. By the way, does anyone know the origin of this pattern?

What I find fascinating is that the magic square can be made with many different elements. It might be possible to use any ring formation that can be joined at a 90 degree angle. I wonder if four ringed flowers (similar to what Mary Konior used in her tatting) would work? I think that will be my next experiment.

24 comments:

  1. Bardzo pomysłowy i rewelacyjnie się prezentuje

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  2. Beautiful !!! I love this variation of your triangle pattern :)

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  3. Love, love, love this! Keep up the fabulous tatting!

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  4. Fantastic idea, this is great and wonderful to see! 5 stars, and hugs, and all that!

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  5. One 'magic square' comes from Tatting With Anne Orr #13 reprinted by Dover - page 19 motif #25 that Jon Yusoff wrote about. This one looks terrific!
    Mama Martin

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    1. Oh wow, I didn't know the original pattern was that old! I actually have Tatting with Anne Orr in my collection, and was able to find the pattern right after I saw your comment. Interesting that the original was presented as a half square rather than a full square. Thanks so much for the information!

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    2. Yes, the Anne Orr pattern is easily made into a square. Jon Yusoff wrote about tatting the Anne Orr motif and when you get to the end of the triangle shown, continuing with chain of 6ds, the ring (4ds, p, 5ds, p 4ds), the chain of 6ds, another ring (4ds, p, 5ds, p 4ds), and then the long chain of 6ds, join to the last picot you made in a chain (you are going back up and attaching to the last 'outside' you just finished), before continuing the chain with 6ds, p, 6ds, and then a ring that attaches to the last ring you made. You can thus make a 'magic' square twice as wide and twice as long (four times the area). Jon inspired me to try it and I made a matching pair. Now, I am currently making one that is four times as long and four times as wide so it will contain 32 of the triangles as shown on page 19 in the Anne Orr book.
      In your 'magic square' Robin, you have a different central motif than you do at the 'corners' where you turn 90' from the outside edge towards the center half-way through the side. If you were to tat a larger square (twice as wide and twice as long), would you keep the outside of the current square the same as it is now and just reproduce it four times or would you use the central motif as you have it now at all the corners except the corners on the outside edge of the final square? I know that is a convoluted question - I hope you understand it!
      Mama Martin

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    3. Oops - forgot to make it clear that when tatting the Anne Orr 'magic' square pattern into larger squares (twice as wide and twice as long OR four times as wide and four times as long), the tatting is continuous with no stops and starts. The only ends besides the two at the end if you are using one colour and started with your ball and shuttle as a continuous thread are the ones when your shuttle empties and you need a full shuttle (use a second ball to refill the shuttle!).
      Mama Martin

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    4. Hmmm...I will have to search for Jon's post. Yes, I am planning on making a larger version of this magic square. I will be using the central portion of the design to travel continuously to new "quadrants" as needed, so there will be no cutting and tying until the very end. The outer edges will remain as they are pictured above, and are designed to connect to one another as well. It's difficult to describe in words, but hopefully I'll have some images to show in a few weeks time :)

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    5. Looking forward to pictures of your tatting!
      Mama Martin

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  6. I have tatted the traditional magic square, boggles the mind a little. I really like your version and suppose that tatting it would be equally mind boggling.

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    1. This one isn't too bad, as the square is still on the small side. Though I plan to tat a larger version (with three more quadrants) and will definitely have to concentrate to keep my place in the pattern!

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  7. Piękny i bardzo elegancki motyw.

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  8. I love your magic square. It's very elegant.

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  9. I love your magic square, I think it would make a lovely coaster, or even a small dolly, it's certainly very elegant

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  10. Yay !!!! You possess some magical talents :-)

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  11. I love reading about your experiments! I remember reading about magic squares, but I think it's time to refresh my memory!

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  12. I'm just loving your work with the 'magic square' & loving your work. Looking forward to seeing more magic from you.
    I have an idea for your other magic square based on Mary Konior's patchwork. I'll let you know if it works.I hope it's alright to try it with your pattern? I wanted a square that was continuous.

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    1. Go for it! Email me if you need any stitch counts.

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